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  #31  
Old 04-24-2009, 10:50 PM
fairlane_68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawson Motorsports
I agree, lets keep it current. It seems every track we go to, guys are asking questions about what can and can't be done.
There are still alot of people out there that love the Thunder.
Chuck
No kidding. The limited number of folks I know who are long time SCCA members and even longer time racers don't know very much about AS cars and rules, and only know them by the noise they make. With AS having this rich of a history, one that can firmly date itself back to the start of the muscle car and pony car wars, it should be getting alot more attention than classes don't put on half the show that a big bore group race does.

In my mind, and this is what drew me to the class, an American Sedan car, whether it's a Mustang, Camaro, or Firebird, is what every pony car owner out there on the road wants their car to be: a car that can not only fly like the wind down the straights, but can cut the hell out of a corner as well, and look and sound good doing it. And anyone with mechanical skills can build one, on a fairly decent budget.

AS may not have the car count that the other more popular classes like SM and the Formula classes, but folks need to know what they're missing.



Now if you'll excuse me, I'm headed back out to the garage. Roll cages don't weld themselves.
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  #32  
Old 04-25-2009, 07:40 PM
Walther
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimwheeler
Tom,
The old perception of six cars starting and two finishing, with the other four left smoking trackside is no longer true.
Speak for yourself!!!
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  #33  
Old 04-27-2009, 09:00 AM
Talladega Talladega is offline
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Default Old Trans Am Driver Jerry Coffee

I have worked at Jerrys and his site is www.coffeescorvettes.com
Jerry bought a new Boss 302 in 1970 gutted it and raced A/S back in the day.
With all the other hot shoes, Jerry has alot of pic and information if you need it.
Jerry would be glad to talk to you about it and share what he has and no's.
Cell # is 570-510-7423 work # is 570-457-7423, or you can email him at ,
jerry@coffeescorvettes.com or even go to his web site and email him.

His 70 Boss sits in storage with updated (71-72) fender flares still on it, as the same for the slicks ,just the way it came off the track in the 70s.

Joe T.
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  #34  
Old 05-05-2009, 04:44 PM
kvaughn333
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Since you are looking for love for the class...

While you are working on your content, one thing you may want to go over is the cost of AS for new racers to the class---maintenance, etc. I am new to AS, in fact so new my car will debut the end of May at Summit Point. Two of the things that drew me in to the class were, once the car was set up, reasonable maintenance costs and the readily available parts. You get good performance, that nice V-8 soundtrack and good looks in a more reasonable package than GT. I was looking at the long term.

Alot of new guys get sucked into the Mazda group because they are perceived as cheap, disposable and easy to fix. While AS cars aren't cheap there is a huge aftermarket supply chain and it is easy to find someone who can do/help with the work you can't do yourself. Body parts are cheap and the cars prove to be very durable.

Another thing I noticed is that AS drivers seem more "real" than the arrive and drive crowd. Everyone I have met liked to talk about their class and car and new alot about them. This goes a long way with a lot of folks.
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  #35  
Old 05-06-2009, 08:13 PM
KelleyHux
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What recap of the current AS class could be complete without the inclusion of the "Whoomah!(tm)" story?

Don't forget to get that info from Frank & Tim.

Kelley Huxtable
"PLAY SAFE"
DMVR
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  #36  
Old 05-14-2009, 01:56 PM
CharlieR CharlieR is offline
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Location: Fallston, MD
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I can help "fill-in" some of the early history of A/S racing, as I probably had one of the first A/S cars to hit the track in March 1992, plus I wrote and published the AmerSedan Newsletter from 1993 to 1996, excerpts of which are in the Archive on this web site. Jay Morris of Ground Control was the key player early on the west coast, and I believe Jay even had input in drafting the first set of rules that we used.

The last major race before A/S became a National class was the 1994 ARRC at Road Atlanta, won by local Sam Moore in the pouring rain.

Please e-mail me if you would like to chat... probably best by phone!

- Charlie Richardson
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  #37  
Old 05-17-2009, 02:48 AM
oldtransamdriver
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Default A sedan - early days - Q times

Some lap time info for those who might want to compare then and now on the tracks that I believe haven't changed any. These are Q times in 1970 when the factory involvement was at its highest.

RA - 1970

1) Follmer, Mustang - 2:31.0
2) Jones, Mustang - 2:31.2
3) Leslie, Camaro - 2:31.7
4) Savage,Barracuda - 2:31.8
5) Posey, Challenger - 2:32.3
6) Donohue, Javelin - 2:32.6
7) Revson, Javelin - 2:33.2
8) Hall, Camaro - 2:34.6

Mid-Ohio - 1970

1) Leslie, Camaro - 1:41.0
2) Donohue, Javelin - 1:41.0
3) Follmer, Mustang - 1:41.3
4) Jones, Mustang - 1:41.3
5) Savage, Barracuda - 1:41.4
6) Hall, Camaro - 1:41.5
7) Titus, Firebird - 1:42.0
8) Posey, Challenger - 1:42.9

In 71 Follmer, Mustang, was 1:39.28 and Donohue, Javelin, was 1:40.35 (1&2)

Lime Rock 1970

1) Donohue, Javelin - 58:8
2) Gurney, Barracuda - 59.2
3) Jones, Mustang - 59.3
4) Leslie, Camaro - 59.4
5) Revson, Javelin - 59.7
6) Savage, Barracuda - 59.8
7) Titus, Firebird - 1:00.0
8) Follmer, Mustang - 1:00.0

Hallett - 1980

In 80 I drove at Hallett with an ex Hoffman 70 T/A camaro, now with a 327 engine with stock heads, but everything else the same as in 70 (with 75 bodywork). I had never seen the place before, and with the wrong rear gear (3:89) and only a few laps, turned a 1:31.7. Given more time and fresh tires and correct gear, probably could have gone into the 27's or 28's. The fast time was high 23's.


Those 70 cars, from memory, had to weigh 3050 lbs. without driver, and ran on 15 x 8 rims. Those races were 2 hrs. plus long, and in my case we treated it like a mini-enduro - kept the revs down and had to save our tires. It wasn't important to beat the car and engine to death for qualifying - just wanted to get on the grid. At some of the eastern tracks 40 plus cars showed up and the promoter would usually only start 33 cars. Some guys went home on the trailer. Our rev limit was 6800. The factory guys ran 8000 plus rpm. My fastest race lap was usually about 2 secs faster than qualifying. Qualifying was usually about 6-8 secs slower than the factory guys.

Good independant cars with some resources could usually get within 2-4 secs. of the factory guys, depending on the length of the track.

It was very important to finish well and collect some prize money ($20,000 purses). A ninth at Lime Rock in 71 paid us $1,000.

One constant battle was the brakes - J 56 Corvette package used on camaros - marginal.

I know that some of the vintage T/A cars are getting close to or beating those times, but they have modernized the brakes and suspensions somewhat and I am told the latest Chevy 302 vintage motor now makes about 560 HP. Back in the day, a strong factory Chev would make about 450-460 and the Fords close to 470 - a far cry from our about 360.

Many of those cars went on to run SCCA A sedan for several years. Some were changed to the new rules for T/A in 73 - big block motors, etc. and others went IMSA racing.

Robert Barg
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  #38  
Old 05-17-2009, 09:25 AM
King Matt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtransamdriver
Some lap time info for those who might want to compare then and now on the tracks that I believe haven't changed any. These are Q times in 1970 when the factory involvement was at its highest.

RA - 1970

1) Follmer, Mustang - 2:31.0
2) Jones, Mustang - 2:31.2
3) Leslie, Camaro - 2:31.7
4) Savage,Barracuda - 2:31.8
5) Posey, Challenger - 2:32.3
6) Donohue, Javelin - 2:32.6
7) Revson, Javelin - 2:33.2
8) Hall, Camaro - 2:34.6

Mid-Ohio - 1970

1) Leslie, Camaro - 1:41.0
2) Donohue, Javelin - 1:41.0
3) Follmer, Mustang - 1:41.3
4) Jones, Mustang - 1:41.3
5) Savage, Barracuda - 1:41.4
6) Hall, Camaro - 1:41.5
7) Titus, Firebird - 1:42.0
8) Posey, Challenger - 1:42.9

In 71 Follmer, Mustang, was 1:39.28 and Donohue, Javelin, was 1:40.35 (1&2)
The current AS lap record at RA is a 2:31.1X. Those M-O times are farther off the current pace on both configurations. Do you know whether they ran the chicane back in those days? If that's the pro course, then a CMC car is faster than that today (the times from '70).
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  #39  
Old 05-17-2009, 10:09 AM
jimwheeler jimwheeler is offline
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I don't think they ran the chicane in '70. I'm not sure it was even there.
I don't know what the AS record is, but I have a 1:38.6 at MidO, and I was about 6th.
wheel
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  #40  
Old 05-17-2009, 10:18 AM
King Matt
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I think the AS record on the Pro Course would have to have been from the last years of the Runoffs, as the club races always use the chicane course.

edit: the club course record is a 1:39.0X, so the pro course should be at least a couple seconds quicker than that. IIRC, it was in the 1:37 range, but would probably be even faster today.
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